dehydrated hash browns
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Dehydrated Hash Browns (from scratch)

Have you ever wanted to make your own dehydrated hash browns? We got the pre-packaged dehydrated ones from Costco for a while, but they have preservatives and aren’t organic so we stopped buying them. They are a great pantry staple though and very versatile in ways to use them. After I finally bought a dehydrator I decided the time had come to master dehydrated potatoes. 

I buy large quantities of potatoes directly from a grower once a year, then use them over the next 6 months (until they are sprouting out of the bag). We don’t buy any more after that. The other 6 months of the year we eat them in whatever form I have preserved them. This is a great way to keep potatoes for future use.

About hash browns

Turns out, the secret to store bought hash browns is that they have already been cooked! After the potatoes are shredded they are “blanched,” which means the shreds cook in boiling water for about 5 minutes, then are placed in an ice water bath. Much too much work in my opinion.

Another option is to partially cook the potatoes in the oven prior to shredding them. This was what I opted for. Although, most people still instruct you to blanch them in boiling water after you shred them. Why? I don’t know. 

The process

So here is the process. I have a large 9-tray dehydrator which fit 8 pounds of potatoes, you can do however many potatoes you think will fit in yours. I rinsed and scrubbed them but did not peel them, as the skin is the most nutritious part of the potato. (Potatoes are one of the most sprayed vegetables, so I highly recommend getting organic to avoid pesticides.) If you want to peel, go for it (no need to scrub if going this route).

Once scrubbed, place them on a baking sheet or directly in the oven, poking them with a fork a few times so they can breathe and not explode. 

Don’t bake them as long as you normally would. I usually bake potatoes at 350 for an hour – I did half that. After 30 minutes take them out and let them sit on the counter for a couple hours before placing in the fridge. (Do 45 minutes if you have large potatoes.) Another option, to speed things up, is to place them in a sink of cold water for 10 minutes and then put them in the refrigerator. (This cools them off faster.)

Refrigerate them overnight, or at least 8 hours, to get them all the way cold and a better texture for shredding. (Note – you want them to be fully cold, but they will gradually turn brown in the fridge. This doesn’t affect the results or taste, but if you want nice yellow hash browns process them after 8 hrs or when they are completely cold all the way through. I once kept mine in the fridge for 2 days. They were fine, but pretty brown.)

Grate/shred the potatoes. I ran them through my food processor and they shredded easily. 

Distribute them evenly among your dehydrator trays. If you have any extra you can freeze them, or cook them up on a skillet for delicious and flavorful hash browns. 

Run the dehydrator for about 9 hours on 125 degrees. They should feel hard and fully dry. Store them in an airtight container, adding an oxygen absorber for a longer shelf life. 8 pounds of potatoes makes 2 – 1/2 gallon jars (1 gallon total hash browns).

Done!

To use, cover the amount of potatoes you intend to use in boiling water and place a lid or plate over them. Wait 5 minutes, drain any water, and cook (fry them in a skillet, put in a breakfast casserole, make potato pancakes, etc.).

In summary, here are the steps: Scrub poke bake refrigerate grate dehydrate store use!

Dehydrated Hash Browns (from Scratch)

Print Recipe
dehydrated hash browns
Prep Time:9 hours
Dehydrating Time:9 hours
Total Time:18 hours

Ingredients

  • 8 pounds Potatoes organic

Instructions

  • Rinse and scrub the potatoes but do not peel them, as the skin is the most nutritious part of the potato. (Potatoes are one of the most sprayed vegetables, so I highly recommend getting organic to avoid pesticides.) If you want to peel, go for it (no need to scrub if going this route).
  • Once scrubbed, place them on a baking sheet or directly in the oven, poking them with a fork a few times so they can breathe and not explode. 
  • Only bake them for 30 minutes (45 if you have large potatoes). Take them out and let them sit on the counter for a couple hours before placing in the fridge. Another option, to speed things up, is to place them in a sink of cold water for 10 minutes and then put them in the refrigerator. (This cools them off faster.)
  • Refrigerate them overnight, or at least 8 hours, to get them all the way cold and a better texture for shredding.
  • Grate/shred the potatoes. I ran them through my food processor and they shredded easily. 
  • Distribute them evenly among your dehydrator trays. If you have any extra you can freeze them, or cook them up on a skillet for delicious and flavorful hash browns. 
  • Run the dehydrator for about 9 hours on 125 degrees. They should feel hard and fully dry. Store them in an airtight container, adding an oxygen absorber for a longer shelf life. 8 pounds of potatoes makes 2 – 1/2 gallon jars (1 gallon total hash browns).
  • To use, cover the amount of potatoes you intend to use in boiling water and place a lid or plate over them. Wait 10 minutes, drain any water, and cook (fry them in a skillet, put in a breakfast casserole, make potato pancakes, etc.).
Servings: 1 gallon

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